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Battalion Commanders in World War 1

It was the first time that such a large cohort of Americans had fought in a British army. Additionally, untried American II Corps and experienced Australian Corps were to spearhead the attack under the command of Lieutenant General Sir John Monash with British divisions adopting supporting roles on the flanks. Blair forensically details the fighting and the largely forgotten desperate German defense. Although celebrated as a marvelous feat of breaking the Hindenburg Line, the American attack failed generally to achieve its set objectives and it took the Australians three days of bitter fighting to reach theirs.

Blair rejects the conventional explanation of the US 'mop up' failure and points the finger of blame at Rawlinson, Haig, and Monash for expecting too much of the raw US troops, singling out the Australian Corps commander for particular criticism. Capture this and the Germans had a good chance of separating the key allied powers. Despite almost destroying Fifth Army and advancing within ten miles of Amiens, the Germans failed in their objective; they turned to a number of other hard thrusts along the line but were foiled on each occasion.

2 The British Artillery in World War I

Reinforced by substantial numbers of American troops, the allies launched their first, French led, counter attack on 18 July, which many considered the turning point of the campaign and, indeed the whole war. There followed a sequence of blows by all the allies along the Western Front, pushing the Germans back to the borders; with her allies collapsing and with the Imperial Navy in a state of mutiny, The book largely concentrates on the British and Dominion troops of the BEF.

The first half is taken up with the attack on Amiens and, to a lesser extent, on Arras. In the second half of the book the author provides a cohesive account of the British response in retaking the initiative from the Germans, though not failing to give allied nations their due. Also includes critical commentary of the performance of armies and generals and 32 black and white illustrations.

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The book is comprised of rare photographs illustrating the German Army fighting a dogged defensive war against superior odds on the Somme. It is accompanied by a powerful text written by Official War Correspondent Philip Gibbs, who was an eyewitness to the events. Photographs from the battlefield illustrate the terrible conditions, which the beleaguered German forces on the battlefield endured in the notorious engagement, which has become synonymous with vainglorious sacrifice. This book incorporates a wide range of images that encompass the actions of the German infantry and their supporting artillery.

Also featured are images, which depict the almost incomprehensible condition of the battlefield and the trenches after more than one million shells had been poured into the German lines. Portraits of the German troops are contrasted with surviving images of captured British prisoners of war and the endless battle to get the supply columns through to the front. Illuminates the strengths and weaknesses of the imperial German army, its view on WWI and British generals, and the relations between Prussia and the other German states.

A new view of a dynamic 'battle-space,' both physical and intellectual, where three armies struggled to outfight and outthink their enemy. Also the tale of a personal tragedy -- of a man who lost a son, a war, and a throne in the course of four short years. The confusion of battle and challenges of command and control are provided through command cards, combat cards and HQ tokens that limit what can be done each turn and custom dice are used to resolve the effects of any combat that occurs.

The game includes scenarios to allow the re-enactment of battles such as Loos, The Somme, and Vimy Ridge as well as many other actions. The board can be reconfigured using terrain tiles to reflect any battlefield of the period and allows additional scenarios to be created. This is the first game in a series that will in time cover all aspects of the war on land with additional figures including cavalry, tanks and artillery and additional nationalities France, USA and Russia being added in subsequent modules.

Future expansions will add other new mechanics and game elements, and open up more opportunities for player-vs-player action.

Records of the American Expeditionary Forces (World War I)

Please note this an expansion and a copy of the core game The Great War is required to play. This history of their experiences starts before the war, but links generations across fronts and also the home front. Only one of the five came home unscathed, while others came home suffering from wounds and illnesses. Hazard and hardship lingered on in the form of Spanish influenza, mining strikes, and the Great Depression. Using extracts of their letters from the front, the story is to a large extent told in the words of those who were there.

Context is provided by referencing existing literature, unpublished memoirs, and archival material. It could be called a military history or a social history, but it is a truly South African story which contains much new material for historians, while for the general reader it offers an accessible insight into an unparalleled period of history. Hansy book for research using a contemporary viewpoint.

Military Records | National Records of Scotland

Hundreds of fishing vessels from every port and harbor in Britain are pressed into minesweeping duties and minelayers sow fields to restrict and destroy German vessels. Their efforts allow the powerful Royal Navy to hold the German Navy in port - except for occasional skirmishes, including the Battle of Jutland. American destroyers hunt U-boats in British waters, while minelayers create a barrier between the Orkney Islands and Norway, to try to deny the enemy entry into the Atlantic.

Desperate, Germany mounts a U-boat offensive off North America in the summer , to induce the US to bring her destroyers home.

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Although nearly one hundred vessels are sunk, this action fails. Germany surrenders in late autumn and allied vessels are left with the deadly task of removing thousands of mines laid in the war.


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One hundred and fifty photographs, maps, and diagrams; appendices; and an index to full-names, places and subjects add value to this work. Most English-language histories of the Great War's battles are based on British sources; the authors of this book based their analyses on many original German sources. With an extensive bibliography that includes German language sources many unpublished , the reader is presented with a different view of the conflict.

Includes 80 color pages and 4 large scale maps. This treatise explains the social, political, and economic structure of the country as it relates to the German military. It is the only English-language source that fully explains the German army-both active and reserve forces coupled with their training and doctrine. More importantly, this book discusses the structural issues in the German army that led directly to its failure at the Battle of the Marne. Specifically, leadership issues, logistical issues, and the misuse of cavalry created significant fissures that could have been corrected before the war.

This is a different view of the Great War than the well-known Guns of August published in The Great War Dawning presents a critical look at the doctrine of the time and how leadership's failure to overhaul outmoded methods led to the downfall of imperial Germany's plans in It describes the new tactics and units developed by the German army during the war, including the myths surrounding Stormtrooper units.

The Eastern Fronts

These new methods used were a result of interaction between the opposing forces and incremental in their appearance. Nevertheless the new ideas were hugely influential and important not only to the German army but to others as well, including British and American forces. Utilizing a wide range of sources, including various pamphlets and manuals that were produced throughout World War I, this fascinating pocket manual gives a German perspective to World War I. The battle continued, however, throughout the autumn and only came to a close in the bitter cold of mid-November.

The British plan relied on the power of artillery to suppress and destroy the German defences; the infantry were tasked with taking and holding the German trenches, but minimal resistance was anticipated. Both sides incurred major losses, however; German doctrine emphasised that the first line had to be held or retaken at all costs, a rigid defensive policy that led to very high casualties as the Germans threw survivors into ad hoc, piecemeal counterattacks all along the line. Featuring specially commissioned full-colour artwork and based on meticulous reassessment of the sources, this engaging study pits the volunteers of Kitchener's 'New Armies' against the German veterans who defended the Somme sector in the bloody battles of July-November At the beginning of , the three empires fighting on the Eastern Front were reaching their breaking points, but none was closer than Russia.

After the February Revolution, Russia's ability to wage war faltered and her last desperate gamble, the Kerensky Offensive, saw the final collapse of her army. This helped trigger the Bolshevik Revolution and a crippling peace, but the Central Powers had no opportunity to exploit their gains and, a year later, both the German and Austro-Hungarian empires surrendered and disintegrated.

Concluding his acclaimed series on the Eastern Front in World War I, Prit Buttar comprehensively details not only these climactic events, but also the 'successor wars' that raged long after the armistice of New states rose from the ashes of empire and war raged as German forces sought to keep them under the aegis of the Fatherland. These unresolved tensions between the former Great Powers and the new states would ultimately lead to the rise of Hitler and a new, terrible world war only two decades later.

Whilst battles such as Ypres, the Somme, and Passchendaele have been inscribed deeply on the public consciousness, with the exception of perhaps Tannenberg, the conflicts in the East do not hold the same recognition. In his new book, Prit Buttar seeks to correct this imbalance with a new insight into the fighting in the East - a magisterial account of the chaos and destruction that reigned when three powerful empires collided.

His harrowing narrative is driven by first-hand accounts and new, detailed archival research to create a dynamic retelling of the tumultuous events of the first year of the war, examining the battles of Masurian Lakes and Tannenberg in East Prussia, followed by the Russo-Austrian clashes in Galicia, the failed German advance towards Warsaw, and the vicious fighting in the Carpathian mountains. Buttar reveals how delays in adapting to a modern war and inadequacies in supply and support arrangements, combined with a failure to plan for a long war, left the three powers struggling to keep up with events, leaving the Central Powers coming to terms with the dreaded reality of a war on two fronts whilst slowly driving Russia towards revolution.

A war that was initially seen by all three powers as a welcome opportunity to address both internal and external issues would ultimately bring about the downfall of them all. In Germany Ascendant, Buttar examines the critical events of , as the German Gorlice-Tarnow Offensive triggered the collapse of Russian forces, coming tantalizingly close to knocking Russia out of the war altogether. Throughout the year, German dominance on the Eastern Front grew -- but stubborn Russian resistance forced the continuation of a two-front war that would drain Germany's reserves of men and equipment.

Packed with first-hand accounts and incredible new information, this is a staggeringly ambitious history of some of the most important moments of World War I. The assault was intended to ease the pressure on Russia's British and French allies by diverting German troops from the Western Front and knocking Austria-Hungary out of the war.

Russia's dismal military performance in the preceding years was forgotten, as the Brusilov Offensive was quickly characterised by innovative tactics, including the use of shock troops, a strategy that German armies would later adapt to great effect. Drawing on first-hand accounts and detailed archival research this is a dramatic retelling of the final years of the war on the Eastern Front, in which the Russian Army claimed military success but at a terrible cost.

Russia's dismal military performance in the preceding years was forgotten, as the Brusilov Offensive was quickly characterized by innovative tactics, including the use of shock troops, a strategy that German armies would later adapt to great effect. The author was Hamish Mann, a young Black Watch subaltern killed in France in just five days after his 21st birthday. Includes 32 black and white illustrations Thanks to Mann's outstanding literary gifts and prodigious output, this book relives his fateful journey from the declaration of war, his voluntary work at a military hospital, his training and commission and, finally, his service with 8th Black Watch on the Somme.

The daily hardship and trauma he experienced at the Front were shared with countless thousands of his comrades. But Hamish's extraordinary gift was his ability to record the traumatic events and the range of his emotions, writing often in his dugout 'by the light of a guttering candle. These detachments had the mission of spreading the Stosstrupptaktik, a new tactic which decisively transformed the fighting methods of the German Army. But long before this happened, another type of troops had been created within the German infantry during the winter of the Shock troops Stosstruppen , fresh infantry groups that were never officially recognized as such and never belonged to any permanent unit, but remained active until the end of the war and contributed to improving the offensive capacity of the German infantry.

This 8. Finally, it offers a comprehensive description of their uniforms, equipment, and weapons, along with a large number of illustrations and period photographs rarely seen. Rare photographs illustrating the optimistic men of the BEF in the act of mobilization and transport to France are contrasted with photographs from the battlefield during the opening phases of the campaign, which culminated in the four-year struggle for the Ypres salient.

Offers rare photographs illustrating the actions of the British infantry and their supporting artillery fighting on the Somme, but it is accompanied by a powerful text written by Official War Correspondent Philip Gibbs, who was an eyewitness to the events. Photographs from the battlefield illustrate the terrible conditions, which the British forces on the battlefield endured in the notorious engagement, which has become synonymous with vainglorious sacrifice. The book is comprised of rare photographs illustrating the years of fighting on the northern sector of the Ypres salient, which finally culminated in the capture of the ridge at Passchendaele, accompanied by a powerful text written by Official War Correspondent Philip Gibbs, who was an eyewitness to the events.

Photographs from the battlefield illustrate the terrible conditions, which the British forces on the battlefield endured in the notorious engagement, which has become synonymous with mud and squalor. This book incorporates a wide range of images, encompassing the actions of the British infantry and their supporting artillery.

Also featured are images which depict the almost incomprehensible state of the waterlogged trenches. Portraits of the British troops are contrasted with German prisoners of war and the endless battle to get the supply columns through to the front. The first Zeppelin attack on London came in May - and with it came the birth of a new arena of warfare, the 'home front'.


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  • German airships attempted to raid London on 26 separate occasions between May and October , but only reached the capital and bombed successfully on nine occasions. From May onwards, this theatre of war entered a new phase as German Gotha bombers set out to attack London in the first bomber raid.